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Grocery Store Tips for Success

Grocery Store Tips for Success


Whether you’re jaded from the J2 cafeteria or have been thrown into the real world of apartment living, you will most likely find yourself at the grocery store at some point in your years at UT. After making multiple trips to a variety of grocers in Austin, I have had many epiphanies of what to do and what not to do while grocery shopping. Here are some of my top tips for a successful and efficient grocery trip.

Photo by Kathryn Stouffer

1. Don’t go on Sunday nights.

Unless you want to play a game of bumper-carts, Sunday night is the opposite of a good time. Imagine unorganized college kids wandering the aisles multiple times, with a few aggressive soccer moms fighting for the last box of SpongeBob mac & cheese. Oh, and the hyped-up children of these soccer moms playing their last game of hide and seek for the day. Try going to the store in the morning or at random times in between your classes.

2. Have a list & stick to it.

Grocery stores can be overwhelming. The choices are endless, and the temptations ubiquitous. If you have a list of essentials, then you will be able to tackle the crowds in good time. Make your list ahead of time or create a go-to list of staples.

Photo by Kathryn Stouffer

3. Do not shop hungry.

You might have heard this piece of advice, but I definitely didn’t believe it until recently. I made a trip to Whole Foods on an empty stomach and while later unpacking my bags, I found quite a few surprises: chocolate covered almonds, ice cream, “insert favorite decadent treat here.” You end up buying more food and your self-control and perception of what you need disintegrates. Grab an apple or cheese stick on your way out the door to curb your hunger.

4. The bulk section is your friend.

Don’t want a massive bag of almonds? Or can’t finish an entire jar of peanut butter? Check out the bulk section. You control how much you want, how much you pay and what you want. Be the pilot of your snack food! This feature is available at most HEB’s, Whole Foods and Central Market. Ask an employee for a sample to get a fun and free treat while you shop.

Feast on these tips and you’ll never play grocery bumper carts again.

The post Grocery Store Tips for Success appeared first on Spoon University.


Our 10 Best Money-Saving Tips and Tricks for the Grocery Store

Keeping the grocery bill down always seems attainable in writing, yet it's a whole different story once your put you go to put that "master plan" into practice (i.e. left the shopping list on the kitchen counter again). That said, with a little willpower, preparation, and know-how, being an exceptionally savvy shopper can become second nature in no time. Here we've gathered our staff's top strategies to keep from blowing the budget by the time you roll around to aisle 12.

To commemorate the 10-year anniversary of MyRecipes&aposs existence this week, our staff is sharing round-ups (by the 10&aposs, obviously)—including some of our most useful tidbits of wisdom, favorite recipes, and amusing tidbits𠅎very day. Today, we&aposre kicking off with our most helpful money-saving tips for your next trip to the grocery store. Whether you love it or not, the grocery store is a place where we all find ourselves on a refular basis, often slightly crestfallen at the end of the experience because of how much money it ended up costing us. But hey—it doesn&apost have to be like this. Here&aposs the gameplan for your cheapest, most productive trip to the supermarket yet.

1. Make a list and stick to it.

Put some thoughtful energy into constructing your shopping list on the front—whether that means keeping a running list on your phone or fridge (so the whole family can contribute) or intentionally sitting down and taking full stock of what you have/what you need before heading out the door—so that you know it&aposs complete. And once you&aposre at the grocery store. if it’s not on the list, it doesn’t go in the cart. End of story.

2. Expand the ol' &ldquostick to the perimeter&rdquo rule.

Yes, stick to the perimeter, but don’t get sucked in by prepared fruit salads, dressed up deli items, and 15 varieties of artisanal yogurt. Just because it’s on the outside of the perimeter doesn’t mean it’s worthwhile, healthy, or necessary.

3. Know the bulk bin aisle is your BFF.

If you only need 1/2 cup of pecans for a recipe you&aposre planning to make this week, there&aposs no sense in paying for the 2-cup bag. then looking for another way to use the rest of the bag and "get your money&aposs worth." Head to the bulk bins, get as little or as much as you need, and be done with it.

4. Save a few bucks by buying the "off-brand."

Most store brands produce identical versions of many of your favorite brand-name food items (even if your kids say they can taste a difference). We won&apost judge, and neither will anybody else.

5. Aim to buy less meat.

And put a stronger emphasis on produce, beans, and grains. This will have a positive impact on your body as well as your wallet.

6. Keep in mind that it's just as important to know what you do have, versus what you don't.

This goes back to point #1 about being intentional and thoughtful with your shopping list. Let the food that you already have waiting for you at home be the base of inspiration for your future meals—thus, the driving factor for what you buy at the store. This way all of your food at home is used up at some point.

7. Remember this: It&rsquos only a deal IF you need it.

Finding a 2-for-1 sale on lobster is great, but only if you were already planning on having a seafood bake, or looking for something special for dinner.

8. Play the &ldquouse it up&rdquo challenge at the store.

If something that wasn&apost on your list catches your eye at the grocery store, try to think of two or three ways you&aposll use the item. If you can&apost, put it back on the shelf.

9. Remember, you don&rsquot need a different protein for every night of the week.

Start with 1-2 animal proteins per week (maybe a couple pounds of a ground meat and then, one of your family&aposs favorite cuts), knowing that you’ll use leftovers creatively and go meatless at least once a week. Keep in mind that a few scraps of leftover meat can be stretched into something delicious tomorrow, so challange yourself not to toss what seems like just a few bites at the end of dinner.

10. Coupons exist, so use them!

This doesn&apost have to turn into an extreme sport or an obsessive hobby. However, if you spot one that fits your needs, don&apost lose it. If your frequent the same stores for routine shopping, see what couponing apps might be able to help you save a few dollars there.


Our 10 Best Money-Saving Tips and Tricks for the Grocery Store

Keeping the grocery bill down always seems attainable in writing, yet it's a whole different story once your put you go to put that "master plan" into practice (i.e. left the shopping list on the kitchen counter again). That said, with a little willpower, preparation, and know-how, being an exceptionally savvy shopper can become second nature in no time. Here we've gathered our staff's top strategies to keep from blowing the budget by the time you roll around to aisle 12.

To commemorate the 10-year anniversary of MyRecipes&aposs existence this week, our staff is sharing round-ups (by the 10&aposs, obviously)—including some of our most useful tidbits of wisdom, favorite recipes, and amusing tidbits𠅎very day. Today, we&aposre kicking off with our most helpful money-saving tips for your next trip to the grocery store. Whether you love it or not, the grocery store is a place where we all find ourselves on a refular basis, often slightly crestfallen at the end of the experience because of how much money it ended up costing us. But hey—it doesn&apost have to be like this. Here&aposs the gameplan for your cheapest, most productive trip to the supermarket yet.

1. Make a list and stick to it.

Put some thoughtful energy into constructing your shopping list on the front—whether that means keeping a running list on your phone or fridge (so the whole family can contribute) or intentionally sitting down and taking full stock of what you have/what you need before heading out the door—so that you know it&aposs complete. And once you&aposre at the grocery store. if it’s not on the list, it doesn’t go in the cart. End of story.

2. Expand the ol' &ldquostick to the perimeter&rdquo rule.

Yes, stick to the perimeter, but don’t get sucked in by prepared fruit salads, dressed up deli items, and 15 varieties of artisanal yogurt. Just because it’s on the outside of the perimeter doesn’t mean it’s worthwhile, healthy, or necessary.

3. Know the bulk bin aisle is your BFF.

If you only need 1/2 cup of pecans for a recipe you&aposre planning to make this week, there&aposs no sense in paying for the 2-cup bag. then looking for another way to use the rest of the bag and "get your money&aposs worth." Head to the bulk bins, get as little or as much as you need, and be done with it.

4. Save a few bucks by buying the "off-brand."

Most store brands produce identical versions of many of your favorite brand-name food items (even if your kids say they can taste a difference). We won&apost judge, and neither will anybody else.

5. Aim to buy less meat.

And put a stronger emphasis on produce, beans, and grains. This will have a positive impact on your body as well as your wallet.

6. Keep in mind that it's just as important to know what you do have, versus what you don't.

This goes back to point #1 about being intentional and thoughtful with your shopping list. Let the food that you already have waiting for you at home be the base of inspiration for your future meals—thus, the driving factor for what you buy at the store. This way all of your food at home is used up at some point.

7. Remember this: It&rsquos only a deal IF you need it.

Finding a 2-for-1 sale on lobster is great, but only if you were already planning on having a seafood bake, or looking for something special for dinner.

8. Play the &ldquouse it up&rdquo challenge at the store.

If something that wasn&apost on your list catches your eye at the grocery store, try to think of two or three ways you&aposll use the item. If you can&apost, put it back on the shelf.

9. Remember, you don&rsquot need a different protein for every night of the week.

Start with 1-2 animal proteins per week (maybe a couple pounds of a ground meat and then, one of your family&aposs favorite cuts), knowing that you’ll use leftovers creatively and go meatless at least once a week. Keep in mind that a few scraps of leftover meat can be stretched into something delicious tomorrow, so challange yourself not to toss what seems like just a few bites at the end of dinner.

10. Coupons exist, so use them!

This doesn&apost have to turn into an extreme sport or an obsessive hobby. However, if you spot one that fits your needs, don&apost lose it. If your frequent the same stores for routine shopping, see what couponing apps might be able to help you save a few dollars there.


Our 10 Best Money-Saving Tips and Tricks for the Grocery Store

Keeping the grocery bill down always seems attainable in writing, yet it's a whole different story once your put you go to put that "master plan" into practice (i.e. left the shopping list on the kitchen counter again). That said, with a little willpower, preparation, and know-how, being an exceptionally savvy shopper can become second nature in no time. Here we've gathered our staff's top strategies to keep from blowing the budget by the time you roll around to aisle 12.

To commemorate the 10-year anniversary of MyRecipes&aposs existence this week, our staff is sharing round-ups (by the 10&aposs, obviously)—including some of our most useful tidbits of wisdom, favorite recipes, and amusing tidbits𠅎very day. Today, we&aposre kicking off with our most helpful money-saving tips for your next trip to the grocery store. Whether you love it or not, the grocery store is a place where we all find ourselves on a refular basis, often slightly crestfallen at the end of the experience because of how much money it ended up costing us. But hey—it doesn&apost have to be like this. Here&aposs the gameplan for your cheapest, most productive trip to the supermarket yet.

1. Make a list and stick to it.

Put some thoughtful energy into constructing your shopping list on the front—whether that means keeping a running list on your phone or fridge (so the whole family can contribute) or intentionally sitting down and taking full stock of what you have/what you need before heading out the door—so that you know it&aposs complete. And once you&aposre at the grocery store. if it’s not on the list, it doesn’t go in the cart. End of story.

2. Expand the ol' &ldquostick to the perimeter&rdquo rule.

Yes, stick to the perimeter, but don’t get sucked in by prepared fruit salads, dressed up deli items, and 15 varieties of artisanal yogurt. Just because it’s on the outside of the perimeter doesn’t mean it’s worthwhile, healthy, or necessary.

3. Know the bulk bin aisle is your BFF.

If you only need 1/2 cup of pecans for a recipe you&aposre planning to make this week, there&aposs no sense in paying for the 2-cup bag. then looking for another way to use the rest of the bag and "get your money&aposs worth." Head to the bulk bins, get as little or as much as you need, and be done with it.

4. Save a few bucks by buying the "off-brand."

Most store brands produce identical versions of many of your favorite brand-name food items (even if your kids say they can taste a difference). We won&apost judge, and neither will anybody else.

5. Aim to buy less meat.

And put a stronger emphasis on produce, beans, and grains. This will have a positive impact on your body as well as your wallet.

6. Keep in mind that it's just as important to know what you do have, versus what you don't.

This goes back to point #1 about being intentional and thoughtful with your shopping list. Let the food that you already have waiting for you at home be the base of inspiration for your future meals—thus, the driving factor for what you buy at the store. This way all of your food at home is used up at some point.

7. Remember this: It&rsquos only a deal IF you need it.

Finding a 2-for-1 sale on lobster is great, but only if you were already planning on having a seafood bake, or looking for something special for dinner.

8. Play the &ldquouse it up&rdquo challenge at the store.

If something that wasn&apost on your list catches your eye at the grocery store, try to think of two or three ways you&aposll use the item. If you can&apost, put it back on the shelf.

9. Remember, you don&rsquot need a different protein for every night of the week.

Start with 1-2 animal proteins per week (maybe a couple pounds of a ground meat and then, one of your family&aposs favorite cuts), knowing that you’ll use leftovers creatively and go meatless at least once a week. Keep in mind that a few scraps of leftover meat can be stretched into something delicious tomorrow, so challange yourself not to toss what seems like just a few bites at the end of dinner.

10. Coupons exist, so use them!

This doesn&apost have to turn into an extreme sport or an obsessive hobby. However, if you spot one that fits your needs, don&apost lose it. If your frequent the same stores for routine shopping, see what couponing apps might be able to help you save a few dollars there.


Our 10 Best Money-Saving Tips and Tricks for the Grocery Store

Keeping the grocery bill down always seems attainable in writing, yet it's a whole different story once your put you go to put that "master plan" into practice (i.e. left the shopping list on the kitchen counter again). That said, with a little willpower, preparation, and know-how, being an exceptionally savvy shopper can become second nature in no time. Here we've gathered our staff's top strategies to keep from blowing the budget by the time you roll around to aisle 12.

To commemorate the 10-year anniversary of MyRecipes&aposs existence this week, our staff is sharing round-ups (by the 10&aposs, obviously)—including some of our most useful tidbits of wisdom, favorite recipes, and amusing tidbits𠅎very day. Today, we&aposre kicking off with our most helpful money-saving tips for your next trip to the grocery store. Whether you love it or not, the grocery store is a place where we all find ourselves on a refular basis, often slightly crestfallen at the end of the experience because of how much money it ended up costing us. But hey—it doesn&apost have to be like this. Here&aposs the gameplan for your cheapest, most productive trip to the supermarket yet.

1. Make a list and stick to it.

Put some thoughtful energy into constructing your shopping list on the front—whether that means keeping a running list on your phone or fridge (so the whole family can contribute) or intentionally sitting down and taking full stock of what you have/what you need before heading out the door—so that you know it&aposs complete. And once you&aposre at the grocery store. if it’s not on the list, it doesn’t go in the cart. End of story.

2. Expand the ol' &ldquostick to the perimeter&rdquo rule.

Yes, stick to the perimeter, but don’t get sucked in by prepared fruit salads, dressed up deli items, and 15 varieties of artisanal yogurt. Just because it’s on the outside of the perimeter doesn’t mean it’s worthwhile, healthy, or necessary.

3. Know the bulk bin aisle is your BFF.

If you only need 1/2 cup of pecans for a recipe you&aposre planning to make this week, there&aposs no sense in paying for the 2-cup bag. then looking for another way to use the rest of the bag and "get your money&aposs worth." Head to the bulk bins, get as little or as much as you need, and be done with it.

4. Save a few bucks by buying the "off-brand."

Most store brands produce identical versions of many of your favorite brand-name food items (even if your kids say they can taste a difference). We won&apost judge, and neither will anybody else.

5. Aim to buy less meat.

And put a stronger emphasis on produce, beans, and grains. This will have a positive impact on your body as well as your wallet.

6. Keep in mind that it's just as important to know what you do have, versus what you don't.

This goes back to point #1 about being intentional and thoughtful with your shopping list. Let the food that you already have waiting for you at home be the base of inspiration for your future meals—thus, the driving factor for what you buy at the store. This way all of your food at home is used up at some point.

7. Remember this: It&rsquos only a deal IF you need it.

Finding a 2-for-1 sale on lobster is great, but only if you were already planning on having a seafood bake, or looking for something special for dinner.

8. Play the &ldquouse it up&rdquo challenge at the store.

If something that wasn&apost on your list catches your eye at the grocery store, try to think of two or three ways you&aposll use the item. If you can&apost, put it back on the shelf.

9. Remember, you don&rsquot need a different protein for every night of the week.

Start with 1-2 animal proteins per week (maybe a couple pounds of a ground meat and then, one of your family&aposs favorite cuts), knowing that you’ll use leftovers creatively and go meatless at least once a week. Keep in mind that a few scraps of leftover meat can be stretched into something delicious tomorrow, so challange yourself not to toss what seems like just a few bites at the end of dinner.

10. Coupons exist, so use them!

This doesn&apost have to turn into an extreme sport or an obsessive hobby. However, if you spot one that fits your needs, don&apost lose it. If your frequent the same stores for routine shopping, see what couponing apps might be able to help you save a few dollars there.


Our 10 Best Money-Saving Tips and Tricks for the Grocery Store

Keeping the grocery bill down always seems attainable in writing, yet it's a whole different story once your put you go to put that "master plan" into practice (i.e. left the shopping list on the kitchen counter again). That said, with a little willpower, preparation, and know-how, being an exceptionally savvy shopper can become second nature in no time. Here we've gathered our staff's top strategies to keep from blowing the budget by the time you roll around to aisle 12.

To commemorate the 10-year anniversary of MyRecipes&aposs existence this week, our staff is sharing round-ups (by the 10&aposs, obviously)—including some of our most useful tidbits of wisdom, favorite recipes, and amusing tidbits𠅎very day. Today, we&aposre kicking off with our most helpful money-saving tips for your next trip to the grocery store. Whether you love it or not, the grocery store is a place where we all find ourselves on a refular basis, often slightly crestfallen at the end of the experience because of how much money it ended up costing us. But hey—it doesn&apost have to be like this. Here&aposs the gameplan for your cheapest, most productive trip to the supermarket yet.

1. Make a list and stick to it.

Put some thoughtful energy into constructing your shopping list on the front—whether that means keeping a running list on your phone or fridge (so the whole family can contribute) or intentionally sitting down and taking full stock of what you have/what you need before heading out the door—so that you know it&aposs complete. And once you&aposre at the grocery store. if it’s not on the list, it doesn’t go in the cart. End of story.

2. Expand the ol' &ldquostick to the perimeter&rdquo rule.

Yes, stick to the perimeter, but don’t get sucked in by prepared fruit salads, dressed up deli items, and 15 varieties of artisanal yogurt. Just because it’s on the outside of the perimeter doesn’t mean it’s worthwhile, healthy, or necessary.

3. Know the bulk bin aisle is your BFF.

If you only need 1/2 cup of pecans for a recipe you&aposre planning to make this week, there&aposs no sense in paying for the 2-cup bag. then looking for another way to use the rest of the bag and "get your money&aposs worth." Head to the bulk bins, get as little or as much as you need, and be done with it.

4. Save a few bucks by buying the "off-brand."

Most store brands produce identical versions of many of your favorite brand-name food items (even if your kids say they can taste a difference). We won&apost judge, and neither will anybody else.

5. Aim to buy less meat.

And put a stronger emphasis on produce, beans, and grains. This will have a positive impact on your body as well as your wallet.

6. Keep in mind that it's just as important to know what you do have, versus what you don't.

This goes back to point #1 about being intentional and thoughtful with your shopping list. Let the food that you already have waiting for you at home be the base of inspiration for your future meals—thus, the driving factor for what you buy at the store. This way all of your food at home is used up at some point.

7. Remember this: It&rsquos only a deal IF you need it.

Finding a 2-for-1 sale on lobster is great, but only if you were already planning on having a seafood bake, or looking for something special for dinner.

8. Play the &ldquouse it up&rdquo challenge at the store.

If something that wasn&apost on your list catches your eye at the grocery store, try to think of two or three ways you&aposll use the item. If you can&apost, put it back on the shelf.

9. Remember, you don&rsquot need a different protein for every night of the week.

Start with 1-2 animal proteins per week (maybe a couple pounds of a ground meat and then, one of your family&aposs favorite cuts), knowing that you’ll use leftovers creatively and go meatless at least once a week. Keep in mind that a few scraps of leftover meat can be stretched into something delicious tomorrow, so challange yourself not to toss what seems like just a few bites at the end of dinner.

10. Coupons exist, so use them!

This doesn&apost have to turn into an extreme sport or an obsessive hobby. However, if you spot one that fits your needs, don&apost lose it. If your frequent the same stores for routine shopping, see what couponing apps might be able to help you save a few dollars there.


Our 10 Best Money-Saving Tips and Tricks for the Grocery Store

Keeping the grocery bill down always seems attainable in writing, yet it's a whole different story once your put you go to put that "master plan" into practice (i.e. left the shopping list on the kitchen counter again). That said, with a little willpower, preparation, and know-how, being an exceptionally savvy shopper can become second nature in no time. Here we've gathered our staff's top strategies to keep from blowing the budget by the time you roll around to aisle 12.

To commemorate the 10-year anniversary of MyRecipes&aposs existence this week, our staff is sharing round-ups (by the 10&aposs, obviously)—including some of our most useful tidbits of wisdom, favorite recipes, and amusing tidbits𠅎very day. Today, we&aposre kicking off with our most helpful money-saving tips for your next trip to the grocery store. Whether you love it or not, the grocery store is a place where we all find ourselves on a refular basis, often slightly crestfallen at the end of the experience because of how much money it ended up costing us. But hey—it doesn&apost have to be like this. Here&aposs the gameplan for your cheapest, most productive trip to the supermarket yet.

1. Make a list and stick to it.

Put some thoughtful energy into constructing your shopping list on the front—whether that means keeping a running list on your phone or fridge (so the whole family can contribute) or intentionally sitting down and taking full stock of what you have/what you need before heading out the door—so that you know it&aposs complete. And once you&aposre at the grocery store. if it’s not on the list, it doesn’t go in the cart. End of story.

2. Expand the ol' &ldquostick to the perimeter&rdquo rule.

Yes, stick to the perimeter, but don’t get sucked in by prepared fruit salads, dressed up deli items, and 15 varieties of artisanal yogurt. Just because it’s on the outside of the perimeter doesn’t mean it’s worthwhile, healthy, or necessary.

3. Know the bulk bin aisle is your BFF.

If you only need 1/2 cup of pecans for a recipe you&aposre planning to make this week, there&aposs no sense in paying for the 2-cup bag. then looking for another way to use the rest of the bag and "get your money&aposs worth." Head to the bulk bins, get as little or as much as you need, and be done with it.

4. Save a few bucks by buying the "off-brand."

Most store brands produce identical versions of many of your favorite brand-name food items (even if your kids say they can taste a difference). We won&apost judge, and neither will anybody else.

5. Aim to buy less meat.

And put a stronger emphasis on produce, beans, and grains. This will have a positive impact on your body as well as your wallet.

6. Keep in mind that it's just as important to know what you do have, versus what you don't.

This goes back to point #1 about being intentional and thoughtful with your shopping list. Let the food that you already have waiting for you at home be the base of inspiration for your future meals—thus, the driving factor for what you buy at the store. This way all of your food at home is used up at some point.

7. Remember this: It&rsquos only a deal IF you need it.

Finding a 2-for-1 sale on lobster is great, but only if you were already planning on having a seafood bake, or looking for something special for dinner.

8. Play the &ldquouse it up&rdquo challenge at the store.

If something that wasn&apost on your list catches your eye at the grocery store, try to think of two or three ways you&aposll use the item. If you can&apost, put it back on the shelf.

9. Remember, you don&rsquot need a different protein for every night of the week.

Start with 1-2 animal proteins per week (maybe a couple pounds of a ground meat and then, one of your family&aposs favorite cuts), knowing that you’ll use leftovers creatively and go meatless at least once a week. Keep in mind that a few scraps of leftover meat can be stretched into something delicious tomorrow, so challange yourself not to toss what seems like just a few bites at the end of dinner.

10. Coupons exist, so use them!

This doesn&apost have to turn into an extreme sport or an obsessive hobby. However, if you spot one that fits your needs, don&apost lose it. If your frequent the same stores for routine shopping, see what couponing apps might be able to help you save a few dollars there.


Our 10 Best Money-Saving Tips and Tricks for the Grocery Store

Keeping the grocery bill down always seems attainable in writing, yet it's a whole different story once your put you go to put that "master plan" into practice (i.e. left the shopping list on the kitchen counter again). That said, with a little willpower, preparation, and know-how, being an exceptionally savvy shopper can become second nature in no time. Here we've gathered our staff's top strategies to keep from blowing the budget by the time you roll around to aisle 12.

To commemorate the 10-year anniversary of MyRecipes&aposs existence this week, our staff is sharing round-ups (by the 10&aposs, obviously)—including some of our most useful tidbits of wisdom, favorite recipes, and amusing tidbits𠅎very day. Today, we&aposre kicking off with our most helpful money-saving tips for your next trip to the grocery store. Whether you love it or not, the grocery store is a place where we all find ourselves on a refular basis, often slightly crestfallen at the end of the experience because of how much money it ended up costing us. But hey—it doesn&apost have to be like this. Here&aposs the gameplan for your cheapest, most productive trip to the supermarket yet.

1. Make a list and stick to it.

Put some thoughtful energy into constructing your shopping list on the front—whether that means keeping a running list on your phone or fridge (so the whole family can contribute) or intentionally sitting down and taking full stock of what you have/what you need before heading out the door—so that you know it&aposs complete. And once you&aposre at the grocery store. if it’s not on the list, it doesn’t go in the cart. End of story.

2. Expand the ol' &ldquostick to the perimeter&rdquo rule.

Yes, stick to the perimeter, but don’t get sucked in by prepared fruit salads, dressed up deli items, and 15 varieties of artisanal yogurt. Just because it’s on the outside of the perimeter doesn’t mean it’s worthwhile, healthy, or necessary.

3. Know the bulk bin aisle is your BFF.

If you only need 1/2 cup of pecans for a recipe you&aposre planning to make this week, there&aposs no sense in paying for the 2-cup bag. then looking for another way to use the rest of the bag and "get your money&aposs worth." Head to the bulk bins, get as little or as much as you need, and be done with it.

4. Save a few bucks by buying the "off-brand."

Most store brands produce identical versions of many of your favorite brand-name food items (even if your kids say they can taste a difference). We won&apost judge, and neither will anybody else.

5. Aim to buy less meat.

And put a stronger emphasis on produce, beans, and grains. This will have a positive impact on your body as well as your wallet.

6. Keep in mind that it's just as important to know what you do have, versus what you don't.

This goes back to point #1 about being intentional and thoughtful with your shopping list. Let the food that you already have waiting for you at home be the base of inspiration for your future meals—thus, the driving factor for what you buy at the store. This way all of your food at home is used up at some point.

7. Remember this: It&rsquos only a deal IF you need it.

Finding a 2-for-1 sale on lobster is great, but only if you were already planning on having a seafood bake, or looking for something special for dinner.

8. Play the &ldquouse it up&rdquo challenge at the store.

If something that wasn&apost on your list catches your eye at the grocery store, try to think of two or three ways you&aposll use the item. If you can&apost, put it back on the shelf.

9. Remember, you don&rsquot need a different protein for every night of the week.

Start with 1-2 animal proteins per week (maybe a couple pounds of a ground meat and then, one of your family&aposs favorite cuts), knowing that you’ll use leftovers creatively and go meatless at least once a week. Keep in mind that a few scraps of leftover meat can be stretched into something delicious tomorrow, so challange yourself not to toss what seems like just a few bites at the end of dinner.

10. Coupons exist, so use them!

This doesn&apost have to turn into an extreme sport or an obsessive hobby. However, if you spot one that fits your needs, don&apost lose it. If your frequent the same stores for routine shopping, see what couponing apps might be able to help you save a few dollars there.


Our 10 Best Money-Saving Tips and Tricks for the Grocery Store

Keeping the grocery bill down always seems attainable in writing, yet it's a whole different story once your put you go to put that "master plan" into practice (i.e. left the shopping list on the kitchen counter again). That said, with a little willpower, preparation, and know-how, being an exceptionally savvy shopper can become second nature in no time. Here we've gathered our staff's top strategies to keep from blowing the budget by the time you roll around to aisle 12.

To commemorate the 10-year anniversary of MyRecipes&aposs existence this week, our staff is sharing round-ups (by the 10&aposs, obviously)—including some of our most useful tidbits of wisdom, favorite recipes, and amusing tidbits𠅎very day. Today, we&aposre kicking off with our most helpful money-saving tips for your next trip to the grocery store. Whether you love it or not, the grocery store is a place where we all find ourselves on a refular basis, often slightly crestfallen at the end of the experience because of how much money it ended up costing us. But hey—it doesn&apost have to be like this. Here&aposs the gameplan for your cheapest, most productive trip to the supermarket yet.

1. Make a list and stick to it.

Put some thoughtful energy into constructing your shopping list on the front—whether that means keeping a running list on your phone or fridge (so the whole family can contribute) or intentionally sitting down and taking full stock of what you have/what you need before heading out the door—so that you know it&aposs complete. And once you&aposre at the grocery store. if it’s not on the list, it doesn’t go in the cart. End of story.

2. Expand the ol' &ldquostick to the perimeter&rdquo rule.

Yes, stick to the perimeter, but don’t get sucked in by prepared fruit salads, dressed up deli items, and 15 varieties of artisanal yogurt. Just because it’s on the outside of the perimeter doesn’t mean it’s worthwhile, healthy, or necessary.

3. Know the bulk bin aisle is your BFF.

If you only need 1/2 cup of pecans for a recipe you&aposre planning to make this week, there&aposs no sense in paying for the 2-cup bag. then looking for another way to use the rest of the bag and "get your money&aposs worth." Head to the bulk bins, get as little or as much as you need, and be done with it.

4. Save a few bucks by buying the "off-brand."

Most store brands produce identical versions of many of your favorite brand-name food items (even if your kids say they can taste a difference). We won&apost judge, and neither will anybody else.

5. Aim to buy less meat.

And put a stronger emphasis on produce, beans, and grains. This will have a positive impact on your body as well as your wallet.

6. Keep in mind that it's just as important to know what you do have, versus what you don't.

This goes back to point #1 about being intentional and thoughtful with your shopping list. Let the food that you already have waiting for you at home be the base of inspiration for your future meals—thus, the driving factor for what you buy at the store. This way all of your food at home is used up at some point.

7. Remember this: It&rsquos only a deal IF you need it.

Finding a 2-for-1 sale on lobster is great, but only if you were already planning on having a seafood bake, or looking for something special for dinner.

8. Play the &ldquouse it up&rdquo challenge at the store.

If something that wasn&apost on your list catches your eye at the grocery store, try to think of two or three ways you&aposll use the item. If you can&apost, put it back on the shelf.

9. Remember, you don&rsquot need a different protein for every night of the week.

Start with 1-2 animal proteins per week (maybe a couple pounds of a ground meat and then, one of your family&aposs favorite cuts), knowing that you’ll use leftovers creatively and go meatless at least once a week. Keep in mind that a few scraps of leftover meat can be stretched into something delicious tomorrow, so challange yourself not to toss what seems like just a few bites at the end of dinner.

10. Coupons exist, so use them!

This doesn&apost have to turn into an extreme sport or an obsessive hobby. However, if you spot one that fits your needs, don&apost lose it. If your frequent the same stores for routine shopping, see what couponing apps might be able to help you save a few dollars there.


Our 10 Best Money-Saving Tips and Tricks for the Grocery Store

Keeping the grocery bill down always seems attainable in writing, yet it's a whole different story once your put you go to put that "master plan" into practice (i.e. left the shopping list on the kitchen counter again). That said, with a little willpower, preparation, and know-how, being an exceptionally savvy shopper can become second nature in no time. Here we've gathered our staff's top strategies to keep from blowing the budget by the time you roll around to aisle 12.

To commemorate the 10-year anniversary of MyRecipes&aposs existence this week, our staff is sharing round-ups (by the 10&aposs, obviously)—including some of our most useful tidbits of wisdom, favorite recipes, and amusing tidbits𠅎very day. Today, we&aposre kicking off with our most helpful money-saving tips for your next trip to the grocery store. Whether you love it or not, the grocery store is a place where we all find ourselves on a refular basis, often slightly crestfallen at the end of the experience because of how much money it ended up costing us. But hey—it doesn&apost have to be like this. Here&aposs the gameplan for your cheapest, most productive trip to the supermarket yet.

1. Make a list and stick to it.

Put some thoughtful energy into constructing your shopping list on the front—whether that means keeping a running list on your phone or fridge (so the whole family can contribute) or intentionally sitting down and taking full stock of what you have/what you need before heading out the door—so that you know it&aposs complete. And once you&aposre at the grocery store. if it’s not on the list, it doesn’t go in the cart. End of story.

2. Expand the ol' &ldquostick to the perimeter&rdquo rule.

Yes, stick to the perimeter, but don’t get sucked in by prepared fruit salads, dressed up deli items, and 15 varieties of artisanal yogurt. Just because it’s on the outside of the perimeter doesn’t mean it’s worthwhile, healthy, or necessary.

3. Know the bulk bin aisle is your BFF.

If you only need 1/2 cup of pecans for a recipe you&aposre planning to make this week, there&aposs no sense in paying for the 2-cup bag. then looking for another way to use the rest of the bag and "get your money&aposs worth." Head to the bulk bins, get as little or as much as you need, and be done with it.

4. Save a few bucks by buying the "off-brand."

Most store brands produce identical versions of many of your favorite brand-name food items (even if your kids say they can taste a difference). We won&apost judge, and neither will anybody else.

5. Aim to buy less meat.

And put a stronger emphasis on produce, beans, and grains. This will have a positive impact on your body as well as your wallet.

6. Keep in mind that it's just as important to know what you do have, versus what you don't.

This goes back to point #1 about being intentional and thoughtful with your shopping list. Let the food that you already have waiting for you at home be the base of inspiration for your future meals—thus, the driving factor for what you buy at the store. This way all of your food at home is used up at some point.

7. Remember this: It&rsquos only a deal IF you need it.

Finding a 2-for-1 sale on lobster is great, but only if you were already planning on having a seafood bake, or looking for something special for dinner.

8. Play the &ldquouse it up&rdquo challenge at the store.

If something that wasn&apost on your list catches your eye at the grocery store, try to think of two or three ways you&aposll use the item. If you can&apost, put it back on the shelf.

9. Remember, you don&rsquot need a different protein for every night of the week.

Start with 1-2 animal proteins per week (maybe a couple pounds of a ground meat and then, one of your family&aposs favorite cuts), knowing that you’ll use leftovers creatively and go meatless at least once a week. Keep in mind that a few scraps of leftover meat can be stretched into something delicious tomorrow, so challange yourself not to toss what seems like just a few bites at the end of dinner.

10. Coupons exist, so use them!

This doesn&apost have to turn into an extreme sport or an obsessive hobby. However, if you spot one that fits your needs, don&apost lose it. If your frequent the same stores for routine shopping, see what couponing apps might be able to help you save a few dollars there.


Our 10 Best Money-Saving Tips and Tricks for the Grocery Store

Keeping the grocery bill down always seems attainable in writing, yet it's a whole different story once your put you go to put that "master plan" into practice (i.e. left the shopping list on the kitchen counter again). That said, with a little willpower, preparation, and know-how, being an exceptionally savvy shopper can become second nature in no time. Here we've gathered our staff's top strategies to keep from blowing the budget by the time you roll around to aisle 12.

To commemorate the 10-year anniversary of MyRecipes&aposs existence this week, our staff is sharing round-ups (by the 10&aposs, obviously)—including some of our most useful tidbits of wisdom, favorite recipes, and amusing tidbits𠅎very day. Today, we&aposre kicking off with our most helpful money-saving tips for your next trip to the grocery store. Whether you love it or not, the grocery store is a place where we all find ourselves on a refular basis, often slightly crestfallen at the end of the experience because of how much money it ended up costing us. But hey—it doesn&apost have to be like this. Here&aposs the gameplan for your cheapest, most productive trip to the supermarket yet.

1. Make a list and stick to it.

Put some thoughtful energy into constructing your shopping list on the front—whether that means keeping a running list on your phone or fridge (so the whole family can contribute) or intentionally sitting down and taking full stock of what you have/what you need before heading out the door—so that you know it&aposs complete. And once you&aposre at the grocery store. if it’s not on the list, it doesn’t go in the cart. End of story.

2. Expand the ol' &ldquostick to the perimeter&rdquo rule.

Yes, stick to the perimeter, but don’t get sucked in by prepared fruit salads, dressed up deli items, and 15 varieties of artisanal yogurt. Just because it’s on the outside of the perimeter doesn’t mean it’s worthwhile, healthy, or necessary.

3. Know the bulk bin aisle is your BFF.

If you only need 1/2 cup of pecans for a recipe you&aposre planning to make this week, there&aposs no sense in paying for the 2-cup bag. then looking for another way to use the rest of the bag and "get your money&aposs worth." Head to the bulk bins, get as little or as much as you need, and be done with it.

4. Save a few bucks by buying the "off-brand."

Most store brands produce identical versions of many of your favorite brand-name food items (even if your kids say they can taste a difference). We won&apost judge, and neither will anybody else.

5. Aim to buy less meat.

And put a stronger emphasis on produce, beans, and grains. This will have a positive impact on your body as well as your wallet.

6. Keep in mind that it's just as important to know what you do have, versus what you don't.

This goes back to point #1 about being intentional and thoughtful with your shopping list. Let the food that you already have waiting for you at home be the base of inspiration for your future meals—thus, the driving factor for what you buy at the store. This way all of your food at home is used up at some point.

7. Remember this: It&rsquos only a deal IF you need it.

Finding a 2-for-1 sale on lobster is great, but only if you were already planning on having a seafood bake, or looking for something special for dinner.

8. Play the &ldquouse it up&rdquo challenge at the store.

If something that wasn&apost on your list catches your eye at the grocery store, try to think of two or three ways you&aposll use the item. If you can&apost, put it back on the shelf.

9. Remember, you don&rsquot need a different protein for every night of the week.

Start with 1-2 animal proteins per week (maybe a couple pounds of a ground meat and then, one of your family&aposs favorite cuts), knowing that you’ll use leftovers creatively and go meatless at least once a week. Keep in mind that a few scraps of leftover meat can be stretched into something delicious tomorrow, so challange yourself not to toss what seems like just a few bites at the end of dinner.

10. Coupons exist, so use them!

This doesn&apost have to turn into an extreme sport or an obsessive hobby. However, if you spot one that fits your needs, don&apost lose it. If your frequent the same stores for routine shopping, see what couponing apps might be able to help you save a few dollars there.


Watch the video: Συμβουλές προς την Επιτυχία.